Index of Internet Tools and Support

The World Wide Web has become a world wide phenomena -- creating a whole new industry of content providers and an explosion of information on the Internet. The following pages provide links to most of the latest software tools and support for your use.

Creating Your Own Web Site

 Browser Safe Color Chart When you're adding a color to your Web page with HTML, sometimes you can just type in the name of the color. But more often than not, you'll need to use what's called the hex code...

 Html Guides HTML (HyperText Mark-up Language) is the software language that makes the WWW work. If you're eager to start creating your own WWW pages, or are simply curious to see the building blocks used for the pages on the WWW, these guides provide a good foundation.

 Web Site Style & Design Links to Web sites, articles, mailing lists, and other resources about designing Web sites that are easy to use and that follow effective principles of marketing.

 Web Design Tools & Software Commercial and shareware tools and software to make your design process easier.

 Announcing Your Web Site "If you build it, they will come." Wrong!! Building your Web site is only the first step. If you don't announce it to the world, you may be the only one who finds it.

 Search Engine Submissions Background information on how to effectively list your site with the major search engines, including references to various companies who provide this service.


Getting Connected

 World Wide Web (WWW) Where other Internet applications rely on one's knowledge of Internet addressing, hierarchical directory structures, and the application's own (sometimes quirky and arcane) set of commands, WWW applications let you click on words - or pictures - to get to where you want to go or what you want to do.

 Connecting to the Internet Getting on the Internet can be one of the biggest challenges -- the following resources can provide direction as you determine the most effective strategy for you.

 Electronic Mail (Email) It's estimated that last year, Internet users sent six billion email messages. This section organizes resources we've collected about the most popular and widely-used application on the Internet.

 FTP (File Transfer Protocol) File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is one way to downloaded cool things from the Internet. The most popular FTP applications are listed below, together with some information about how and where to use FTP.

 Gopher Described as "the first Internet application that my mom and dad could use" by Project Leader Mark MacCahill, Gopher was developed at the University of Minnestota (where the little furry animal is the campus mascot). Although the Gopher protocol is rarely used today, its introduction was a true landmark in the evolution of the Internet.

 Internet Relay Chat (IRC) IRC allows you to chat in realtime on the Internet. Following are links to some of the best IRC resources on the 'Net.

 Subject Indexes and Search Tools It has been said that the Internet is like a huge public library with no card catalog. The following collections and search tools represent the efforts of many individuals and organizations to improve access to information on the Internet. Each site is organized differently, so it is your choice to decide which site is the most efficient for your style of inquiry. Some sites provide references across many applications (such as the WWW, Gopher, and FTP) and others concentrate on cataloging the growth of the World Wide Web only. Think of each link below as a starting off point, as they all provide hundreds (even thousands) of choices of where to go next.

 Netiquette Yes, it means what you think it means: tips on polite usage of the Internet. As more and more people start using the Internet, more and more is being written about the social conventions of this special community. Following are the titles of our current favorite sites related to netiquette.

 Searching the Internet It's been said that the Internet is like a huge public library with no card catalog. These collections and search tools represent the efforts of many individuals and organizations to improve access to information on the Internet. Each one is organized or searches differently, so the choice is yours to decide which one works the best for your style of inquiry. Some provide references across many applications (like the WWW, Gopher, and FTP) and others concentrate on cataloging the growth of the World Wide Web only. Think of each link below as a jumping off point, as they all provide hundreds (some thousands) of choices of where to go next.

 Finding Other Internet Software This section contains our picks of the best general collections of Internet software. These resources are often duplicated from one site to the other, so it's probably best to find the collection that suits you and then return there from time to time to look for the latest updates.

 Telnet Before the World Wide Web made graphical access to the Internet possible, computers on the Internet understood only typed commands (much like DOS). Telnet was (and is) a way of connecting to these computers and typing in these commands. Typically, you gained access to these computers from a "terminal" - a simple computer directly connected to the larger, more complex "host." Telnet software is "terminal emulator" software - that is, it pretends to be a terminal directly connected to the "host", even though its connection is actually made through the Internet. Now that the WWW has become the preferred way to access most resources, Telnet is seldom used, except for special applications, system administration, and to access archaic systems.

 Usenet (aka "Newsgroups") Newsgroups started when a few people at a few campuses wanted to share information through postings for anyone to read and respond to. Legend has it that way back then - about 10 years ago - you could read every message in every group over a (single) cup of coffee. Today there are thousands and thousands of newsgroups on every topic imaginable. Each Internet service provider decides how many of the newsgroups it will make available, but most services provide at least several thousand newgroups for their clients to access. Through the use of newsgroups, terms such as "spaming" (useless/blatantly promotional messages posted en masse) and "flaming" (a torrent of angry replies to a message) originated. If you spam a group, you're likely to get flamed (see netiquette). Still, reading the newsgroups can be fascinating (sometimes really useful) and asking a question can elicit replies from all over the world.

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